BILINGUAL FAIR | RECAP

BILINGUAL FAIR

On FEB 3, LFSF was one of the two lead sponsors of the much awaited first SF Bilingual Fair! Over 600 visitors visited Le Meridien San Francisco to attend the event organized by the web news platform French Morning.

The LFSF booth was centrally located. Students, teachers, parents, board members and staff welcome parents who were curious and wanted to better understand the benefits of bilingualism.

Those were discussed and presented during the various conferences. LFSF had invited two prestigious speakers. Both were extremely interesting (you will find their presentations on our website shortly)and eager to continue working with our community.

Ashley Chung

from York University (Lifespan Cognitive Development Lab)

The Lifespan Cognition and Development Lab is led by Dr. Ellen Bialystok, OC, PhD, FRSC, distinguished Research Professor of Psychology and Walter Gordon York Research Chair of Lifespan Cognitive Development at York University. It is a cognitive neuroscience laboratory in the Department of Psychology at York University. Its research examines the effect of bilingualism on cognitive and linguistic processing across the lifespan.

ENJOY THE PRESENTATION HERE

Covadonga Lamar Prieto

from University of California, Riverside (Bilingualism Matters).

Bilingualism Matters began as a public information service at the University of Edinburgh in 2008, in response to a lack of information about bilingualism in the community. In October, 2017, Bilingualism Matters at UCR launched a new branch to bring together researchers at UCR and elsewhere with the linguistically and culturally diverse community in Southern California.

ENJOY THE PRESENTATION HERE

ESSAY CONTEST

The essay contest award ceremony was also a highlight of the day. Emmanuel Texier, our head of school, announced the winners and it is with great pride that we counted numerous LFSF students amongst the finalists and congratulate Hirad for winning the Middle School prize!

Here's Hirad's essay, followed by a few quotes from his peers.

How bilingualism shapes you

Bilingualism doesn’t just mean that you can speak two languages fluently; being
bilingual means that you are aligned with two different cultures, it means that you are exposed to two distinct schools of thought, arts, and lifestyles. By being assimilated into two different cultures, by being at the same time in the heart of France and the United States, bilingualism profoundly shapes you.
A clear example of how bilingualism draws you into a different culture is shown through
reading or watching films in another language. For example, when I’m reading Asterix et Obelix, a French comic book, I get an unmistakable taste of French humor that I would not get if I were reading it in English, for the touching hilarity of its jokes are lost in the translation. This phenomenon, if you will, cannot be scientifically proven yet it is very present. By being a bilingual of French and English, for example, one is exposed to both their distinct musical, literary and cinematic mindsets, which ultimately shapes one artistically.
Being bilingual not only influences one’s artistic side, it also influences one’s way of
thinking or philosophy. A bilingual student of French and English knows proverbs and quotes of the two languages, and these reflect upon their respective culture. For example, the English saying of “The pen is mightier than the sword” is synonymous with English culture. The English are more of a negotiating people, a people who prefer to settle differences through writing and debate, and this quote clearly demonstrates this. The French quote of “C’est cela l’amour, tout donner, tout sacrifier sans espoir de retour” from Albert Camus (roughly translated as “That is love, to give away everything, to sacrifice everything, without any desire for anything in return”) shows the romantic aspect of French culture. By being bilingual, one experiences the philosophies, the schools of thought of two different cultures which influences one’s way of thinking, shaping them.
In conclusion, by adding to your artistic culture and by influencing your way of thinking,
bilingualism deeply shapes you.

Bilingualism has given me much more than the ability to speak two languages. I owe my rising awareness of the broader world to my bilingual and bicultural education. I hope to use this gift to better understand and respect the diversity of other cultures and people in our world, 2 wherever they may be. My aspiration is to shape my identity as multi-cultural – as someone who can view and make sense of the world with different points of view and most importantly as a “global citizen of the world.” - Hannah

The ability to express oneself clearly and precisely is crucial to being understood and to understanding others, so speaking two languages doubles one’s ability to connect. Being bilingual has shaped and defined me. (...) I consider myself fortunate to be bilingual. I have the power to see a wide range of attitudes and personalities. As I grow older, I hope to use this gift to live a fuller life and to make a difference to others" – Maxime

Bilingualism is an opening towards biculturalism; in fact, it is hard to disassociate them, for they are inextricably linked. I have learned much about France and its people, though I have always 2 lived in the United States, because I grew up reading French novels, thereby accessing the personal experience of the French-speaking world. (...) I therefore contend that bilingualism is not just a state of mind, but also indicates a force of mind. It is bound with critical thought and broad horizons, but also with the possibility to break down the walls which separate humanity into isolated communities, and isolated individuals. – Calvin

 

Read full essays:

Colin • read essay >>

Calvin  • read essay >>

Hannah  • read essay >>

Nolwenn  • read essay >>

Maxime  • read essay >>

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