Cycle 2 • Gr 1+2+3

learning fundamentals

To learn at school is to question the world. It is also acquiring specific languages, acquisitions for which simply growing is not enough. Cycle 2 now covers the period from CP to CE2, providing the time and consistency needed for progressive and demanding learning. In Cycle 2, all teachings question the world. The mastery of languages, especially the French language, is the priority.

In Cycle 2, students have time to learn

At LFSF, children who enter Cycle 2 are all very different from each other. With over 50 nationalities on campus, our students come from many places on the globe. They grew up and learned in different family and school contexts that naturally influence their learning and their pace. The class is organized around their individualized needs and if students learn together, they do so progressively and each at their own pace.

In Cycle 2, meaning and automation are built simultaneously.

Understanding is essential to the development of solid knowledge that students can reinvest and the automation of certain skills is the way to release cognitive resources so that they can access more sophisticated operations and understanding. All teachings are concerned. In mathematics for example, understanding the various operations is essential to the development of this knowledge that students reinvest. At the same time, immediately available knowledge (such as results from multiplication tables) greatly enhances "smart calculus" capabilities, where students understand what they are doing and why they are doing it. In questioning the world, the construction of temporal landmarks responds to the same logic:

In Cycle 2, the French language is the central learning object

The construction of meaning and automation are two dimensions necessary for the mastery of the language. The mastery of the functioning of the phonographic code, which goes from the sounds to the letters and vice versa, constitutes an essential stake of the learning of French in the cycle 2. However, the learning of the reading also requires to understand texts narrative or documentary, to begin to interpret and appreciate texts, understanding what sometimes is not quite explicit. This learning is conducted in writing and reading simultaneously and complementary.

The central place given to the French language is not acquired at the expense of other learning. On the contrary, language is also a tool at the service of all the learning of the cycle in fields that each have their own language. To appropriate a field of learning is to be able to identify and use little by little specific vocabularies. This identification starts in cycle 2, continues and intensifies in the following cycles. The versatility of teachers [2]allows to favor situations of transversality, with regular feedback on fundamental learning. It makes it possible to develop projects in which students seize the French language as a communication tool, with real recipients, by reporting on visits, experiences and research. Language is a means to give more meaning to learning, since it builds the link between the different teachings and makes it possible to integrate experiences into language.

In Cycle 2, we continue to articulate the concrete and the abstract

Observe and act on the real, manipulate, experiment, all these activities lead to the representation, whether it is analog (drawings, images, schematizations) or symbolic, abstract (numbers, concepts). The link between practical familiarization and conceptual elaboration is always to build and reconstruct, in both directions.

In Cycle 2, speaking and writing are significantly out of step

What a student is able to understand and produce orally is much higher than he can understand and produce in writing. But both oral and written are closely related, and in Cycle 2, students have access to structured writing, production and reading-comprehension. In all lessons, students learn that speaking or writing is both translating what one thinks and respecting rules, it is being free on the substance and constrained on the form. This gap between oral and written is particularly important in the learning of modern languages. Cycle 2 helps set the stage for the first development of pupils' competence in several languages, first and foremost. Teaching and learning a living language, foreign or regional, must put students in a position to practice in the language, to reflect on the language and the processes and strategies they mobilize in situation. Work on language and culture are inseparable.

In Cycle 2, intuitive knowledge still holds a central place

Outside of school, in their families or elsewhere, children acquire knowledge in many areas: social (rules, conventions, uses), physical (knowledge of body, movements), oral language and culture. This knowledge prior to teaching, acquired implicitly, is used as a foundation for explicit learning. They are at the heart of awareness situations, where students begin to understand what they can do without thinking, and use intuitive knowledge as a resource to monitor and evaluate their own actions (eg, judging a verbal form is correct, apprehend a quantity, reason logically).

In Cycle 2, we learn how to carry out basic school activities

which can be found in several courses and will be found throughout schooling: solve a problem, understand a document, write a text, create or design an object. The links between these various basic academic activities will be highlighted by the professors who will highlight the analogies between the objects of study (for example, solve a mathematical problem / implement a process of investigation in science / understand and interpret a text in French / receive a work in arts) to highlight similar elements and differences. Without teachers taking charge of this work, only a few pupils discover by themselves the modus operandi of these basic school activities and the relations that characterize them.

In Cycle 2, we learn critical thinking

In the context of an activity, students learn how to do complete the activity, as well as how to explain why they did it in such a way. They learn to justify their answers and their approach in link to the lesson they are working on : one does not justify in the same way the result of a calculation, the comprehension of a text, the appreciation of a work or observation of a natural phenomenon. Gradually, this way of thinking allows students to question and to analyze what they have done as well as to appreciate what has been done by others.

Learning in English

Learning in English • Grade 1

In First grade, LFSF students continue to reinforce their oral language skills and vocabulary. The main emphasis of this grade is to teach students to apply their knowledge of letters and sounds to the tasks of reading and writing. Over the year, through exposure to literature, poetry and informational texts, students develop key reading comprehension skills and strategies, as well as a familiarity with basic literary elements. Content area learning in science, math and social studies is harmonized through literature to support the French National Curriculum. By the end of First grade, students read accurately at or near grade level, write independently, and express themselves orally with confidence and clarity. They also begin to develop the tools necessary to manage their work, materials, and relationships with attention and care.

English First Grade classes at LFSF include:

  • Introduction to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt reading program : Phonics, literature, poetry and informational text, comprehension strategies, decoding strategies, spelling and beginning grammar study
  • Journaling
  • Book writing project
  • Scholastic News magazines
  • Class report writing

Oral Language Goals:

  • Join discussions and speak clearly to the group
  • Produce well-structured sentences to ask, answer and tell
  • Use word parts to predict the meaning of new words in context
  • Use regular verb tenses to talk about the past, present and future
  • Connect new vocabulary to concrete examples, movements or pictures
  • Build vocabulary to provide precise descriptions of people, places and events
  • Correctly use possessive nouns, pronouns, common conjunctions and prepositions when speaking

Written Language Goals:

  • Use capital letters and end punctuation in writing
  • Spell words by following basic phonetic patterns (short/long vowel patterns, consonant digraphs and blends)
  • Spell commonly seen sight words and studied words correctly

Reading Goals:

  • Recognize short and long vowel sounds in spoken words
  • Decode 1-syllable words accurately using phonics skills (short/long vowel patterns, consonant blends and digraphs, vowel blends, r-controlled vowels, hard/soft consonants)
  • Read age-appropriate sight words and root words with simple added endings (-ing)
  • Read age-appropriate literature, informational texts and poetry with accuracy, self-correcting when necessary
  • Practice reading comprehension strategies with the class (answer questions, predict, use images to confirm understanding)
  • Make simple inferences
  • Understand and identify key literary elements in a story (character, setting, plot, narrator, author, illustrator)
  • Compare and contrast between stories and real life experiences
  • Identify the moral of a story
  • Follow written directions
  • Recognize logical connections in informational texts
  • Identify author’s reasons and important details in informational text

Writing Goals:

  • Develop confidence in written expression through varied tasks
  • Write complete sentences
  • Write small paragraphs of 2-4 sentences on a single topic
  • Write an opinion with 1-2 reasons
  • Write a short narrative based on real or imagined events
  • Participate in a group or class research and writing project
  • Begin to understand how to use the writing process to review, correct and improve writing with help from adults

Autonomy and Responsibility Goals:

  • Care for materials and supplies at school
  • Complete age appropriate class work and homework with some support
  • Write neatly in either print or French cursive, leaving spaces between words

Learning in English • Grade 2

In Second grade, LFSF students continue to build the reading and writing skills introduced in First grade. In oral activities, they develop the social skills necessary for positive collaboration through discussion. They extend their knowledge of phonetic rules for reading and writing, and begin to explore the workings of basic English grammar. Throughout the year, they write frequently, developing confidence in a variety of written expression activities. They are exposed to a wide variety of literature, poetry and informational texts, through which they continue to develop more reading comprehension skills and strategies, as well as an increasing number of literary elements. Content area learning in science, math and social studies is harmonized through literature and projects to support the French National Curriculum. By the end of Second grade, students can read fluidly at or near grade level, and express themselves in writing clearly. They understand what and why they are learning, and become active learners with responsibilities for their own materials and tasks.

English Second Grade classes at LFSF include:

  • Continuation of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Reading program: Phonics, Literature, poetry and informational text, Vocabulary, Comprehension strategies, Decoding strategies, Spelling, Early grammar study
  • Scholastic Weekly Reader Magazine
  • Research writing project
  • Narrative
  • Opinion paragraph
  • Journals

Language Goals:

  • Participate in discussions respectfully with relevant points, speaking clearly to the group
  • Ask and answer questions about a specific topic
  • Recognize some examples of formal and informal language
  • Use various strategies (root words, context, glossaries) to find the meaning of a new word
  • Connect new vocabulary to meaningful examples
  • Identify antonyms and synonyms for a word
  • Produce and expand declarative, interrogative, exclamatory and imperative sentences
  • Identify nouns, verbs and adjectives
  • Correctly use possessive nouns, reflexive pronouns, subject-verb agreement, irregular plural nouns and common irregular verbs (went, saw) when speaking
  • Identify correct prepositional phrases (I am at school, I’m going to the park)
  • Use end punctuation in writing different types of sentences
  • Use commas in a series of items
  • Capitalize names, the pronoun I, proper nouns and the first letter in a sentence
  • Spell known or unknown words with grade-level spelling patterns: long vowels, consonant clusters, double consonants, adding affixes (e.g. -ed, -ing)
  • Spell high frequency sight words and studied words correctly
  • Form contractions and regular possessives with an apostrophe

Reading Goals:

  • Use regular phonics patterns and syllable patterns to decode two-syllable words
  • Use base words and affixes to read multisyllabic words
  • Read age-appropriate sight words and abbreviations
  • Read age-appropriate literature, informational texts and poetry from diverse cultures
  • Read silently at or near grade level with accuracy, self-checking for understanding, and re-reading when needed
  • Read aloud fluently, using expression and voicing dialogue, with repeated readings
  • Use reading comprehension strategies (ask and answer wh- questions, make and adjust predictions, use images to confirm understanding)
  • Make inferences
  • Identify literary elements in a story (characters, setting, plot, narrator, dialogue)
  • Compare and contrast between two stories
  • Retell a story and identify the moral or lesson
  • Recognize how authors use specific words or phrases to make a story or poem sound interesting (e.g. rhymes and repetition)
  • Distinguish fact from fiction
  • Recognize main ideas, details and purpose in informational texts
  • Identify cause and effect connections and sequence of events in informational texts
  • Use headings, captions and glossaries to better understand informational text

Writing Goals:

  • Write complete sentences to answer a question
  • Compose short paragraphs with topic sentence, details, and closing sentence
  • Write a paragraph opinion piece with logical reasons and linking words (e.g. because, also)
  • Write a personal or imagined narrative with detailed descriptions and sequencing
  • Complete a group research writing project, rephrasing information in their own words
  • Use the writing process with guidance to plan, draft, correct and publish a final draft of a written assignment

Autonomy and Responsibility Goals:

  • Care for materials and supplies at school and at home
  • Complete age appropriate class work and homework with little support
  • Write neatly in either print or French cursive, using both upper and lowercase letters, leaving spaces between words

Learning in English • Grade 3

In Third grade, LFSF students complete their second “cycle” of education, in which they solidify the fundamental skills of reading and writing. In oral activities, they develop language skills to effectively join discussions and give presentations. They reinforce their knowledge of phonetic rules, applying them to increasingly complex texts with multisyllabic words. They learn that reading is a source of ideas and information, and begin to write small research pieces. Through chapter book read-alouds and short stories, poems and informational texts, third graders continue to add to their supply of reading comprehension strategies as well as an appreciation of literary devices. Content area learning in science, math and social studies is harmonized through literature and projects to support the French National Curriculum. By the end of Third grade, students read fluently at grade level, and express themselves independently in writing. They are able to manage single-sitting assignments autonomously in class, begin taking ownership of their work through self-reflection, and complete homework regularly with little assistance.

English Third Grade classes at LFSF include:

  • Continuation of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Reading program: Phonics, literature, poetry and informational text, vocabulary, comprehension strategies, spelling, grammar study, literary elements
  • Scholastic Weekly Reader Magazine
  • Critical thinking and opinion journals
  • Book reports, State project research report, and narrative writing

Oral Language Goals:

  • Engage in discussions with various partners, ask questions, and respectfully respond to others’ ideas
  • Identify main ideas from an oral or audio presentation
  • Prepare and give a short oral presentation, speaking clearly and maintaining eye contact
  • Use formal and informal language appropriately in discussions, class, free time, or presentations
  • Use various strategies (root words and affixes, context, beginner dictionaries) to find the meaning of a new word
  • Understand and use alphabetical order
  • Understand the difference between the literal and figurative sense of a common phrase or idiom
  • Distinguish shades of meaning of related verbs and adjectives
  • Identify word-study terms (e.g, antonym, prefix, root word)
  • Produce and expand sentences with coordinating conjunctions
  • Identify parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adjectives, pronouns and adverbs
  • Correctly use me/I, irregular verbs, irregular nouns, pronoun agreement (She saw her dad.)
  • Use correct prepositional phrases (I am on the bus, I read for an hour), and more prepositions (during)

Reading Goals:

  • Use regular phonics patterns, syllable patterns, root words, affixes, and common Latin endings (-able) to read multisyllabic words
  • Read age-appropriate sight words and abbreviations
  • Read age-appropriate literature, informational texts and poetry from diverse cultures
  • Read silently at grade level with accuracy, self-checking for understanding, and re-reading when needed
  • Read aloud fluently with practice, using expression and distinguishing dialogue with repeated readings
  • Use reading comprehension strategies regularly (ask and answer closed questions, make and revise predictions, make connections, summarize, visualize and use images to confirm understanding)
  • Make inferences about characters
  • Understand and identify literary elements in a story (characters, setting, plot, narrator, dialogue, conflict, resolution, point of view)
  • Compare and contrast themes, settings or plots of two similar stories
  • Retell stories and identify the moral and important details
  • Recognize the differences between literal and figurative meanings in a text
  • Identify poetic elements
  • Recognize main ideas, details and purpose in informational texts
  • Identify introduction, body, conclusion and organizational structure in informational texts
  • Use headings, captions and glossaries to better understand informational text

Writing Goals:

  • Write complete sentences to demonstrate critical thinking
  • Write paragraphs with topic sentence, details, and closing sentence
  • Write 1-2 paragraph opinion piece with logical reasons and linking words
  • Write a 2-3 paragraph narrative based on real or imagined events with detailed descriptions and sequencing words
  • Complete a 3 paragraph research project, rephrasing information from provided materials in their own words
  • Use the writing process with guidance to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish a final draft of a written assignment

Written Language Goals:

  • Identify complete sentences, run-ons and incomplete sentences
  • Correctly capitalize and punctuate sentences
  • Use commas in a series of items or in the English formulation of the date
  • Capitalize names, the pronoun I, proper nouns, holidays and the first letter in a sentence
  • Identify a dialogue is marked by quotation marks
  • Spell known or unknown words with grade-level spelling patterns
  • Spell high frequency sight words and studied words correctly

Autonomy and Responsibility Goals:

  • Care for materials and supplies at school and at home
  • Complete age appropriate class work and homework with little support
  • Use simple rubrics to assess own work
  • Write neatly in either print or French cursive, using margins and indicating new paragraphs by indenting or skipping lines